At 2.0 we currently offer two types of Yoga-

YIN: Wednesday at 7:30pm and Sunday 11:45am

POWER: Tuesday at 5pm


Yin yoga

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yin yoga is a slow-paced style of yoga with poses, or asanas, that are held for longer periods of time—five minutes or longer per pose is typical.[2] It was founded by and first taught in the United States in the late 1970s by martial arts expert and Taoist yoga teacher Paulie Zink.[3][4][5] Yin-style yoga is now being taught across North America and in Europe, due in large part to the teaching activities of yin yoga teachers Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers.[6][7]

Yin yoga poses apply moderate stress to the connective tissues—the tendons, fascia, and ligaments—with the aim of increasing circulation in the joints and improving flexibility. They are also designed to improve the flow of qi, the subtle energy said in Chinese medicine to run through the meridian pathways of the body. Improved qi flow is hypothesized to improve organ health, immunity, and emotional well-being.[7][8] A more meditative approach to yoga, yin aims at cultivating awareness of one's inner silence, and bringing to light a universal, interconnecting quality.[9]

Yin yoga as taught by Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers is not intended as a complete practice in itself, but rather as a complement to more active forms of yoga and exercise.[3] However, Paulie Zink's approach includes the full range of taoist yoga and is intended to be a complete practice in itself.[10]:21 Sarah Powers has developed a system called Insight Yoga which features both Yin poses and more active yang-style poses.[11][12]

Ashtanga vinyasa yoga

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Power yoga)

This article is about a style of yoga consisting of six series founded by K. Pattabhi Jois. For the eightfold yoga path, a system first described in Patañjali's Yoga Sūtras, see Rāja (Ashtanga) Yoga.

K. Pattabhi Jois teaching Ashtanga yoga with Larry Schultz, mid 1980s.

Ashtanga vinyasa yoga, usually referred to simply as Ashtanga yoga, is a style of yoga codified[1][2] and popularized by K. Pattabhi Jois and is often promoted as a modern-day form of classical Indian yoga.[3] Pattabhi Jois began his yoga studies in 1927 at the age of 12, and by 1948 had established the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute for teaching the specific yoga practice known as Ashtanga (Sanskrit for "eight-limbed") Yoga.[4] Ashtanga Yoga is named after the eight limbs of yoga mentioned in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.[5]

"Power yoga" and "vinyasa yoga" are generic terms that may refer to any type of vigorous yoga exercise derived from Ashtanga yoga.[6]